Route of the Week: Pervertical Sanctuary to the Forrest Finish

By Blake Herrington, 25 August 2013

  • DATE

    25 August 2013


    Blake Herrington


    Rock Climbing

No list of Rocky Mountain National Park’s routes would be complete without a representative line from the park’s most famous alpine feature, the Diamond on Longs Peak. Pervertical Sanctuary is an excellent route with a couple sustained 5.10 pitches following a good 5.8 warmup. It’s a major step up from the aptly-named “casual route,” which is mostly 5.8 and 5.9 climbing. is Probably graded a tad soft at 5.11a, Pervertical requires thin and wide crack skills on the two crux pitches, but both provide excellent protection opportunities. To truly climb “The Diamond,” rather than just an arbitrary chunk in the middle of the face, move right and slightly down from where most parties rappel, and keep climbing. This traverse is done at Table Ledge, or the horizontal crack feature which continues rightward as the crack peters out, and brings you quickly to the Forrest Finish. From here, two more long pitches of vertical 5.9 gain the top of the Diamond, and a quick walk leads to the summit of Longs Peak.

For more beta, check out’s page on Pervertical Sanctuary [LINK].

Go-To Gear for Climbing in RMNP

Air Brake Gloves [LINK]

Ferrosi Hoody [LINK]

Rambler Pants [LINK]

Axiom Jacket [LIINK]

Voodoo Pants [LINK]

Men’s Echo l/s Duo Tee [LINK]

Women’s Essence Hooded Henley [LINK]

Blake Herrington

Leavenworth, WA

Blake Herrington learned to climb as a teenager while working for a small bakery in North Cascades National Park. His first trips into the mountains instilled in him a familiarity with untraveled alpine choss and a love for remote peaks. Now in his mid-20s, Blake has lived in Denver and Bellingham, before recently settling into the mountain town of Leavenworth, Wash. He has established over two-dozen new alpine routes or first free ascents from Alaska, to Colorado to Argentina.

Blake is also a widely-published author, having contributed articles to Alpinist, Climbing and Rock & Ice. He has climbed sport and traditional pitches up to 5.13a, but considers diverse alpine routes the most engaging and inspiring sub-set of climbing. Despite savoring the alpine cooking of many climbing partners, he counts himself among the best camp chefs he’s had the opportunity to climb with.