Tiny House Tour Episode 3

By Zack Giffin, 24 November 2013

  • DATE

    24 November 2013


    Zack Giffin


    Skiing & Snowboarding

Every moment in the mountains lends an opportunity to learn. A lifetime education awaits those willing to explore, watch, and listen. And sometimes we meet purveyors of the knowledge, people who have made it their intention to understand the intricacies of the snow, and share what they’ve learned about the many varieties of a snowflake. These snow aficionados are our greatest educators, devoted to dissecting the element that brings skiers life and death simultaneously. 

The tiny house arrived in Utah at the beginning of a storm cycle that would invigorate the mountain community with pow turns, while burying a weak layer in the snowpack that would require trepidation in the backcountry. In the two weeks the tiny house lived in Utah, many slides were seen and experienced by skiers and snowboarders across the Wasatch. Instead of playing our usual roles in this act, we became the audience and learned from a friend of the Utah Avalanche Center, Trent Meisenheimer, a passionate snow safety ambassador who grew up at the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon.

Following Trent and his father Bruce (a man who should be put in the Ski-Loving Father Hall of Fame) into the special ski stashes of the Cottonwoods (yes, they still exist), we investigated our own capacity to learn and re-learn what we already thought we knew. You’re never too experienced in the backcountry. And there is always something new to digest.

“Education is the process of living, not preparation for the future.”

Zack Giffin

Gold Hill, CO

Zack Giffin grew up skiing and playing soccer with two brothers in the small mining town of Gold Hill, Colorado. Years of ski trips and movie projects with brothers Jeff and Sam lead to involvement and eventual leadership of Right On Brother Productions, a film company now headed by Sam.

In 2003, Zack and Sam moved to Mt. Baker Washington to work in the terrain park and pursue film making in the Pacific North West, where they both still live. A close relationship with friend and photographer Grant Gunderson created many travel opportunities and photos published. Called one of Washington’s “Alpine Icons” by Ski Washington Magazine, Zack has been featured in every major ski magazine, and he has done video projects for ESPN, Skiing and Powder magazine.

These days you can find Zack traveling the winters in a 112 square foot Tiny House he built in the fall of 2011, or in a remote part of British Columbia filming for the upcoming Sweetgrass Productions release “Valhalla.”​

Skiing & Snowboarding